Tag Archives: graffiti

Melburn 2050 – A city in flames.

12 Feb

Its the year 2050 and the city of Melbourne has changed beyond all recognition. The City is divided, its buildings torn down and destroyed by decades of armed conflict. The outer suburbs have descended into chaos, the inhabitants deformed and mutated by solar radiation interacting with the chemicals that built up in peoples bodies after years of excessive consumption of energy drinks. Their bodies have become wrecked by a hyper metabolism and a constant need to feed them selves, turning them into mindless zombies driven only by the need to eat. The inner City threw up a defensive wall to keep the cannibalistic hoards at bay whilst at the same time turned on each other along the cultural and physical divide of the north and south banks of the Yarra river. The South Bank was controlled by Crown Corp and their Coalition lackeys, setting up their HQ in the enormous casino that dominated the south bank of the CBD and from where they could launch Kill Squad raids across the river. The North side is the final bastion of the social democracy that Australia once was and is fighting desperately to protect what justice remains.

Beset by the ravages of an out of control climate, Melbourne’s average summer temperatures soared to 50°C (122°F) and a dramatic spike in UV levels have seared the landscape and decimated the population. In 2025 The Australian government introduced subsidized skin darkening drugs designed to increase the body’s production of melanin as a defense against the devastating effects of skin cancer related deaths. By the age of 35, 80% of Australians were being diagnosed with skin cancer and the death rate had risen to over 20,000 per year, mainly those of fair skinned Anglo-Saxon decent. In the space of decade the colour of the whole Australian population shifted towards a deep dark brown, those that refused to take the drugs for what ever reason continued to suffer from the ravages of the sun and died in their thousands or took to wearing clothing that covered the whole body, leaving only the eyes exposed.
This caused a radical shift in the politics of the time, the racial prejudices that had been a constant undercurrent throughout Australia’s history, and that had resulted in the the Stolen Generation, Tampa and other atrocities were no longer viable. The anti cancer drugs had forced a desperately needed equality onto the population but which caused fury in the ranks of the hardcore neo-liberals, who saw it as a attack on the fundamentals of Australian culture and its British heritage . Resentment that had been simmering away ever since the Coalition lost to the Australian Labour Party in 2007 exploded into violence in the great Uprising of 2027. The Coalition with the support of the major corporations they represented launched a series of assassinations against key Government figures and moved to occupy the streets of the major urban centres.

IMG_0979IMG_0969IMG_0959IMG_0928IMG_0952Through archway
Back Street1command HQBack alley1nighttime brewreyHAHA sniperOgryn caught in the spotlight

Miniature Photography, a set on Flickr.

The miniature city comes together

“Writers Bench” 30 years of Melbourne Graffiti

7 Nov

Writers Bench takes the audience on a first-hand journey through the historical timeline of graffiti and street art culture in Melbourne, exploring some of the revered artists who have helped to shape Melbourne’s cultural identity.

My good friend and filming partner Oriel Guthrie has been slaving away on her graffiti doco “Writers Bench” for over 2 years now, and finally, with less then a week until the premier she has finished of the last interviews and the movie is all ready to go. This is a masterful doco, with over 40 interviews with artists from throughout Melbourne’s Graffiti and street art scenes, both past and present.

My role in the production was assisting with some of the special FX sequences with the graff images as well as the final colour grading and corrections. In addition to 30 years of graffiti this doco also covers 30 years of video formats from super 8, VHS, Beta Cam, Hi8, DV, HDV and HD as well as photos, both print and digital. It was a mammoth task with only 2 weeks to complete the colour grading as well as it being the first feature length film that I have graded. The aim was to blend all the different formats together, to make the graffiti burst off the screen and to try and capture the colour and vibrancy that it brings to the urban landscape. Im very proud to have played a small role in helping put this incredibly exciting project together and the dedication Oriel has shown in working throughout the last 2 years is a testament to her commitment in telling these stories to the world.

Check out the trailer Here:

Meet the legends of the graffiti and street art scene from the past 30 years, as Writers Bench guides you through the events that created the culture as we see it today. Hear stories of growing up with the movement, why each artist got involved and what influenced their style. From its raw beginnings as political and radical slogans plastered on walls throughout the suburbs, to the colourful burst of murals splashed along urban train lines, to the rise of street art as an inner city tourist attraction, Writers Bench traces the evolution of this vital artistic movement.

Local filmmaker Oriel Guthrie continues her investigation into Melbourne subcultures following on from her 2004 featurette, Skip Hop (2004), which screened at ACMI earlier this year.

Directed by Oriel Guthrie & Spencer Davids.
Colour grading and SFX by Flynn Buckland

Screening at The Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI)
Sat 12th November 4pm (premiere)
Sat 19th November 4pm
Sat 26th November 4pm

buy tix online:
http://www.acmi.net.au/oz_writers_bench.aspx

RMIT – the formative years

7 Sep

During my years at RMIT I was lucky in that I met a great bunch of like minded people and developed both a strong working relationship and friendship with all of them over the years. Whilst everyone in the course wanted to be a director of short drama’s, a small group of us had our focus on documentary production. Adam Potrykus, Oriel Guthrie, Cassandra Bakic and I worked on a number of projects together over these years and I am excited to now be sharing them with you.

Skip Hop

With out a doubt the most exciting doco project during those years at RMIT was Oriel Guthrie’s “Skip Hop”, a documentary on Australian Hip Hop culture. There is a great deal to say about this project, which i’ll hold onto until a later post but until then check out the trailer.

Cut Outs

In December 2003 ‘Cut Outs’ won The Best Film at the RMIT University Screen awards and was nominated in following categories: Best Cinematography, Best Soundtrack, Best Post production. In July 2004 “Cut Outs” won Best Tertiary Documentary at ATOM Awards. ATOM stands for Australian Teachers of Media and it is annual festival, which highlights the best works in film and television Australia wide. The film was also included in the St Kilda Film Festival and the Melbourne Underground Film Festival (MUFF) in 2004. Directed and edited by Cassandra Bakic, this was an incredible project to work camera on. We explored the back alleys of Melbourne, finding hidden gems tucked away behind bins out the back of Chinese restaurants or half way up a wall. The intro of this film still blows me away and after the recent attempts to save the Banksy art failed, it is a glimpse back into Melbourne’s street art history. In addition to doing most of the camera work i also have a few cameos, firstly as the graffer at the end of the intro and then as the face of Prism as he was unable to make it for the shoot.

This film is by Adam Potrykus and is a short film about monogamy and open relationships. I was always impressed by Adams visual style and the interesting ways in which he dealt with visuals and this is in my opinion his best work from his RMIT days. The mixture of stills and location footage as a visual background to the voice over, as opposed to straight interview footage, helps carry the viewer through their thoughts whilst giving you a snap shot of the personalities of the subjects.

In addition to the documentary work that I was envolved with at RMIT, I also was camera operator on a number of Niel Bilas’s short dramas

Debris: 19 Mins (2004)

A heroin user with a stutter and his bulimic girlfriend live through their conditions, wilfully unaware of the others struggle. Her self-loathing has also found its outlet in the arms of a sadist, who gratifies his urges through dominance and perversion. A romance set amidst the backdrop of the urban sprawl, we discover that life touches all – even those that live in the shadows.

Writers Bench – Melbourne Graffiti doco

22 Aug

This is a trailer for the graffiti documentary that Oriel Guthrie has been working on for the last year or so. I have been assisting with some of the graphics and special effects and with enough time hopefully will be able to work on the colour grading before its screening at ACMI later in the year. check it out, its fresh